I'm The Grumpy Lion, and I design things.

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.
Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.
1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.
2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.
3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”
You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.
Zoom Info
gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.
Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.
1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.
2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.
3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”
You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.
Zoom Info
gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.
Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.
1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.
2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.
3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”
You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.
Zoom Info
gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.
Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.
1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.
2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.
3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”
You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.
Zoom Info

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

rapunzelie:

chocolatemermaidya:

rapunzelie:

do you ever feel like there’s just so many pretty girls but most dudes are just subpar like there are radiant goddesses everywhere and just piles and piles of guys in backwards baseball caps and sandals

it’s called makeup

you can put eyeliner on a frat boy that doesn’t change the fact that’s he’s wearing a neon muscle shirt and nike flip flops

honorobblestark:

"In the books the cup gets under the table and Tyrion goes there and takes it himself. On the show we see Sansa kneeling, taking the cup and giving it to Tyrion. That small scene, written by GRRM personally, is a significant evidence of how the author sees the relationship between these two characters. They are not enemies, they are not even indifferent, they are allies, they help each other and give each other comfort when they can. They care about each other. And it’s not based on passion or lust, as with so many of the relationships in the series, but on mutual understanding, sympathy and kindness." (x)
Zoom Info
honorobblestark:

"In the books the cup gets under the table and Tyrion goes there and takes it himself. On the show we see Sansa kneeling, taking the cup and giving it to Tyrion. That small scene, written by GRRM personally, is a significant evidence of how the author sees the relationship between these two characters. They are not enemies, they are not even indifferent, they are allies, they help each other and give each other comfort when they can. They care about each other. And it’s not based on passion or lust, as with so many of the relationships in the series, but on mutual understanding, sympathy and kindness." (x)
Zoom Info
honorobblestark:

"In the books the cup gets under the table and Tyrion goes there and takes it himself. On the show we see Sansa kneeling, taking the cup and giving it to Tyrion. That small scene, written by GRRM personally, is a significant evidence of how the author sees the relationship between these two characters. They are not enemies, they are not even indifferent, they are allies, they help each other and give each other comfort when they can. They care about each other. And it’s not based on passion or lust, as with so many of the relationships in the series, but on mutual understanding, sympathy and kindness." (x)
Zoom Info
honorobblestark:

"In the books the cup gets under the table and Tyrion goes there and takes it himself. On the show we see Sansa kneeling, taking the cup and giving it to Tyrion. That small scene, written by GRRM personally, is a significant evidence of how the author sees the relationship between these two characters. They are not enemies, they are not even indifferent, they are allies, they help each other and give each other comfort when they can. They care about each other. And it’s not based on passion or lust, as with so many of the relationships in the series, but on mutual understanding, sympathy and kindness." (x)
Zoom Info
honorobblestark:

"In the books the cup gets under the table and Tyrion goes there and takes it himself. On the show we see Sansa kneeling, taking the cup and giving it to Tyrion. That small scene, written by GRRM personally, is a significant evidence of how the author sees the relationship between these two characters. They are not enemies, they are not even indifferent, they are allies, they help each other and give each other comfort when they can. They care about each other. And it’s not based on passion or lust, as with so many of the relationships in the series, but on mutual understanding, sympathy and kindness." (x)
Zoom Info

honorobblestark:

"In the books the cup gets under the table and Tyrion goes there and takes it himself. On the show we see Sansa kneeling, taking the cup and giving it to Tyrion. That small scene, written by GRRM personally, is a significant evidence of how the author sees the relationship between these two characters. They are not enemies, they are not even indifferent, they are allies, they help each other and give each other comfort when they can. They care about each other. And it’s not based on passion or lust, as with so many of the relationships in the series, but on mutual understanding, sympathy and kindness." (x)